Smart Phones and Dumb People

“The deep reading that used to come naturally has become a struggle.”

I was an avid reader from elementary school through high school, but something happened when I went to college. I still love books and reading, but there is something so dull about reading words on a page after a long day of classes, group meetings, and stress when it would be much more relaxing to watch my favorite TV show on Netflix.

It’s sad to me that I rarely find the time for reading for fun because I’m too busy with school work, but I don’t only blame my busy schedule. A part of me believes that my lack of reading is due to the amount of time I spend caught up in social media or just on my computer clicking a different link every few seconds, searching for articles and reading them. I can feel myself losing focus as well as my ability to think clearly about one topic for very long.

“My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles.”

It is important to note that this article states that we are reading more than we were in the 1970’s and ’80s when television was the most popular medium for information and entertainment. Β In the second article about electracy, the author identifies electracy as a “third dimension of thought, practice, and identity.” This idea enhances the former to justify the fact that less and less people are interested in committing to academia. Perhaps because of lack of curiosity, or because this world is beginning to shape us into overly stimulated people with less mystery to uncover.

I have realized especially through starting this blog that, when I miss-spell a word, I rely on the computer to spit out what it thinks I meant to say, then I right click on the mistake to have the computer fix it. It is this kind of reliance that sends people into oblivious and captivated awe with the web and all it can do for us. Convenience is one thing, but this also creates a gateway to not knowing how to spell certain words. To me, this is detrimental to us, but as society’s needs are changing, perhaps our abilities change with it – rather than retain knowledge of how to spell words, we know how to order technology to fix them for us.

Plato

Metaphysics is certainly an interesting subject, to say the least. The shift from the Ancient Greeks to now has been incredible, and laden with changes and have caused humanity to question the very basis of our arts and philosophies. I believe that the world functions the way it does because science and ethics, arts and philosophy all exist together harmoniously and have the ideas are able to assists thoughts of one another so that science can be an art, ethics can reside with philosophy, and all combinations of left and right-brained endeavors are relevant.

New media networked practices are transitional, hybrid forms and experiments.”

In today’s society, it is easy to get wrapped up in social mediums and online chatter. It clearly has had on impact on relationships between people, in good and bad ways alike. I think that the turn of the century has yielded several amazing steps that have allowed us as humans to question our intelligence and vivacity as we innovate new ways to communicate. Certainly these reinventions are not perfect, but they are making it easier for people to meet and network, which has sent the whole population out of one way of life and into another.

I can Skype my best friend in Ireland. I can call my family whenever I want. I can text my friends and know that they will get the message in a matter of seconds. What we have is truly fantastic, and I think that both of these articles have given interesting accounts of how we got here.

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